Should You Talk About Your Competitors?

Recently I changed day-jobs and so I’ve started picking up new Twitter followers at a higher rate. One thing I always do is check out the people who are following me to see what I did that drew them and what they’re up to. It’s an easy way to see what is going on in the world that finds you relevant.

One of my recent follows was Jeremy Chatelaine of QuickMail.io – mentioned in his profile how it helps you “get more responses from cold emails with less effort” – that seems right up my alley, so I checked it out to find a great landing page:

Quickmail Competition Call Out

This is right below the header and before you do anything else on the site they tell you “Go check and check out our competitors…”

Wait, What?

Yeah that’s some ballsy confidence there but I’m guessing it works more often than not. If you have the confidence in your product to put your competitors right below your banner on your site that most readers will subconsciously devalue them out of hand. “Why would he link directly to them if he thought I’d not come back?” is the logic there.

This appeal to authority with confidence is really strong, and very effective. I came to this site without having heard of the product but having used two of the competitors he lists. Before reading the client testimonials, I was already thinking of the downsides to the ones I had used and assuming that Quickmail had them fixed.

So does your competition matter? Sure they do, if you’re an inferior product you’ve got an uphill climb. But if you are confident in your offering, what your competition does doesn’t matter – and eventually you can even send your prospects to them yourself as the ultimate show of confidence.

I have not used Quickmail.io yet so I can’t endorse the product, but I love the salesmanship here